Adrianne’s typical day with volunteering

On a typical day I leave my apartment at about 10:15 in the morning and walk through the shopping district of Belgrade to reach Refugee Aid Miksaliste’s Center.

I arrive at 10:30 and linger around the main, open area for a few minutes, saying hello to anyone I recognize. Then I go back to the women’s corner and prepare for my English lesson.

15369280_1803750116558271_5135586068171589508_oAt about 11 three or four girls join me for English. I take a less-organized approach, letting their questions dictate many of the things we talk about (they’re very curious girls). We learn for about an hour and a half, and then they return to the camp they live in.

I leave Miksaliste and head over to the barracks, where the homeless men/boys and a few families live.

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There, Hot Food Idomeni drives up in a white van to distribute hot soup. By the time I arrive, usually around 12:40, there’s already a line of refugees about 200-deep.

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I watch the line, making sure people don’t cut. It’s boring when there’s enough volunteers to watch the line and hectic when there’s not. I had someone once complain, telling me I was very bad at my job, that when I turned my back four people would cut. I could only agree and apologize–I try to do a good job, but when I put my arm around one guy to pull him out, others will hop in right behind me.

Overall, though, the mood is relaxed, and I enjoy chatting with some of the boys as they pass by. Very few of them can pronounce my name (and I have trouble with their names also). It took me an hour and a half to realize that one teenager wasn’t calling me “Angry,” it was just the best he could do with my name, “Adrianne.”

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A few days ago one of the volunteers bought some balls, and the younger boys have a lot of fun with it. At this time I pick out a few people in the line that need any items that I brought in my coat pockets. I typically carry down two paris of socks, gloves, scarf, and a hat and discreetly hand them off as the line progresses. This is all thanks to the friends and family that donated money!

20161231_130036The food usually runs out around 2 pm, and by that time the main distributor of Refugee Aid Serbia has stopped by to assess what clothing people need. I and any other volunteers follow the RAS director to a nearby park.

Because RAS has limited good and manpower, they usually focus on getting new arrivals blankets and whatever winter clothing they have (right now it’s just hats. We’re hoping for more gloves/scarves/coats donations soon). We usually take care of 10-15 people a day. If there’s lots of volunteers, we can hand out more–today we handed out 46 blankets and 9 jackets! That’s because there were lots of volunteers to carry things and a woman came down from London with two suitcases packed with jackets.

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After assessing the needs of the men/boys who show up to meet us in the park, we head to the RAS warehouse. In the photo it looks a little disorganized, but the next day Jordan and a few others went down and straightened and labelled the boxes.

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After we grab our allotted amount of stuff, we walk back out to the park together and distribute is quietly, quickly, and calmly. Too much noise will draw other refugees, and suddenly we’d have a sea of clamoring people all wanting the same jacket. It could also draw the police, who find groups of refugees suspicious and would probably crack down on them and us.

I finish distributing around 3 pm, say my goodbyes to other volunteers and refugees I know, and make the 15-minute hike home. Sometimes I help direct people to Miksaliste, the police station for official paperwork, or back to the barracks. But generally I start heading home after 3.

Then I spend the rest of the afternoon/evening shopping, cooking, resting in our studio apartment and preparing my next English lesson.

That’s about it!

 

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Categories: Serbia | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

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4 thoughts on “Adrianne’s typical day with volunteering

  1. Jamie Aussieker

    Thank you for sharing your stories. It helps me put things into perspective, We, Americans, are so richly blessed and sometimes ignorant of our neighbors and their suffering. You and Jordan are in my prayers. Be strong and courageous!!!

    • Yes, I have learned so much from them! It’s really amazing what they’ve been through and how they cling to hope despite it all.
      I’ve learned that we Americans are fortunate this hasn’t happened to us. We’re no different than them, we were just lucky enough not to be born in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, or even Pakistan.
      Thank you for your prayers!

  2. Nancy

    The pictures say a thousand word. Thank you!

  3. Tanya Karasek

    Yes, we so appreciate you sharing your thoughts and hearts along with your work and service.

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